Thursday, May 14, 2015

Will my son with hearing loss have a normal life?

Every year thousands of children are diagnosed with hearing loss setting families on an unknown journey.  And every day these children go on to live happy and productive lives.  Let me reassure you, your son can and will experience the fun of childhood and enjoy growing up.  He will go to school, learn, make friends, skin his knees, learn to ride a bike and have his share of fights on the playground.  He will grow and reach his potential.  Early identification and intervention, technology and the professionals you work with, will help you and your family through this time. 

There is much that can be done to help children with hearing difficulties including your son.  The key is getting started.  You will want to maximize his hearing ability through the use of hearing instruments.  Your audiologist will help you find the best devices for him.  He/she will work with you in understanding the instruments, and how use and maintain them. 

Working with a speech pathologist is also key.  It is important for your son to develop strong speech and language skills. He will need support through school and may have an IEP (Individual Education Plan) to outline the necessary support.  This will give him the best chance to succeed in school.
If your son has a severe to profound loss of hearing you may decide to send him to one of the local schools that specialize in teaching children with hearing problems. Working with professionals trained in hearing can be very helpful.  Plus, being with other children who have hearing loss will help him to feel “just like one of the kids”.


All of this will give him the best opportunity to achieve success.  Treatment for pediatric hearing loss is an important tool in helping your son enjoy an active life.  Ongoing care, and regular visits to the audiologist will ensure that his hearing ability is always at its best.  It’s a process and you will be his most important advocate.  Life Sounds Great!  He too will enjoy every moment.

Thursday, April 30, 2015

What is the ringing in my ears?


Ringing in the ears, known as tinnitus, can be very annoying.  For many who experience tinnitus, it can be intermittent or constant.   Tinnitus generally accompanies hearing loss, but in rare cases may be a symptom of a more serious health issue. 

There are several things you can do to minimize tinnitus:

  • Avoid exposure to loud sound and noise
  • If you have high blood pressure, seek a physician’s help to control it
  • Decrease your intake of salt
  • Avoid stimulants such as coffee, tea, cola and tobacco
  • Exercise daily to improve circulation
  • Get adequate rest and avoid fatigue

Hearing aids can help to manage tinnitus.  Amplifying sound and producing ambient noise, hearing aids are believed to reduce the loudness and prominence of tinnitus.  Often, hearing aids are recommended to manage this annoying phenomenon.

The first step you should take is to receive a complete Audiological Evaluation by an audiologist.  This will provide information regarding the nature and degree of your hearing loss and determine if you are gaining benefit from your present hearing aids.  Current technology allows the hearing instruments to somewhat compensate for the tinnitus.  These steps may assist you in dealing with this very anxiety provoking problem.
May is Better Hearing Month!  Schedule a baseline hearing test today. Call and schedule an appointment with an audiologist.




Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!












Jane Kukula, Au.D.Paula Webster, M.A.
 
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848440-205-8848Fax: 440-205-9818http://www.aacHEAR.org
























Image obtained on 4-29-15 at: http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=images+of+ringing+in+the+ears&view=detailv2&&&id=112661E3AA3C06A24C29C81072
C7F589FEF4B2E6&selectedIndex=112&ccid=zqvOYdJH&simid=607995493662720109&
thid=JN.4oqwZ9HRDT687HBaeirxjg&ajaxhist=0

Thursday, April 23, 2015

What does hearing mean to people?



Hearing is many things for us.  We use it to communicate with one another.  We share ideas, thoughts and daily life activities through language.  This important skill, language, develops naturally just by over hearing others talk.  Newborns typically have their first word between 9-12 months of age without formal instruction.  Without hearing, speech and language need to be taught.

Hearing provides us information as to what is happening around us.  When we hear footsteps, we know someone is coming into the room.  We know where to look for the keys when we hear them fall off the counter.  It’s the sound of garage door opening that tells us a loved one is home.

Hearing helps to keep us safe.  The smoke detector, a kitchen timer, the siren of a fire truck provide information that helps keep us safe.

There are many sounds in our world that give us pleasure. The laughter of a son and the giggle of grandchild become cherished moments. The “ping” of a golf club hitting a ball, the “crack” the spoon makes when it breaks through a crème brulee, the “drip” of the melting snow, “rustle” of the newspaper all add to life.  

Hearing connects us to the world.  Without it, we would miss the sound of birds and the wind in the trees.
Hearing is usually taken for granted.  People often tell us, they didn’t realize all the ways hearing enhanced their lives.  Take good care of your hearing.  Use hearing protection around loud sounds.  Eat well, a diet high in fruits and vegetables and exercise helps to maintain healthy ears.  Take good care of your ears.


Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!
Jane Kukula, Au.D.Paula Webster, M.A.
 
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848440-205-8848Fax: 440-205-9818http://www.aacHEAR.org











 
Image obtained on 4-7-15 at: https://www.google.com/search?q=images+of+footsteps&biw=1176&bih=757&tbm=isch&imgil=gto3BfDRLsFqzM%253A%253BJ9yc0apws_6jgM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.nexusmods.com%25252Fskyrim%25252Fmods%25252F46559&source=iu&pf=m&fir=gto3BfDRLsFqzM%253A%252CJ9yc0apws_6jgM%252C_&usg=__8r81FZErAvGHjn1jt0o490sR4VY%3D&dpr=1&ved=0CDcQyjc&ei=RwEkVZbSIcv0oASytILYCA#imgrc=gto3BfDRLsFqzM%253A%3BJ9yc0apws_6jgM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fstatic-7.nexusmods.com%252F15%252Fmods%252F110%252Fimages%252F46559-1-1383812444.gif%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.nexusmods.com%252Fskyrim%252Fmods%252F46559%3B300%3B263

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Why do I hear some people better than others?



There are three main factors that impact your ability to hear and understand speech.
The first factor is the listener. How well do you hear?  Do you use hearing instruments if recommended?  Do you receive regular hearing care?  Are you able to see the face of the person talking?  Does he or she have your attention?  How far are you from the person talking?
The second factor is the speaker (the person talking).  Does he or she have a familiar voice?  Does the speaker project, and speak slowly and clearly.  Have you noticed it’s more difficult to hear someone with an accent?  The speaker’s expressions, body language, mannerisms and your interest in the subject play a role.

The third factor is the room.  Does it have high ceilings and hardwood floors? If so, there is likely an echo which decreases your understanding of words.  Loud background noise also interferes with your ability to communicate. All of these and more effect your ability to hear and understand. If you feel you are not hearing as well as you could, make an appointment.  Have your hearing and hearing instruments checked. 
 

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!
Jane Kukula, Au.D.Paula Webster, M.A.
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848440-205-8848Fax: 440-205-9818http://www.aacHEAR.org












 
 

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Is it typical for people to not realize what they can’t hear?




Yes, people rarely think about their hearing until there is a problem.  People often tell us, they didn’t realize all of the ways hearing enhanced their lives until they experienced a decrease in hearing.

We use hearing to communicate with one another.  We share ideas, thoughts and daily life activities through language.  This important skill, language, develops naturally just by over hearing others talk.  Newborns typically have their first word between 9-12 months of age without formal instruction.  Without hearing, speech and language need to be taught.

Hearing provides us information as to what is happening around us.  When we hear footsteps, we know someone is coming into the room.  We know where to look for the keys when we hear them fall off the counter.  It’s the sound of garage door opening that tells us a loved one is home.

Hearing helps keep us safe.  The smoke detector, a kitchen timer, the siren of a fire truck and more, provide necessary safety information.

There are many sounds in our world that give us pleasure. The laughter of a son and the giggle of grandchild create cherished moments. The ping of a golf club hitting a ball, the crack the spoon makes when it breaks through the top of the crème brulee, the drip of melting snow, and the rustle of newspaper all add to the quality of life.  

Hearing connects us to the world.  Without it, we would miss the sound of birds and the wind in the trees.  Have you ever counted the chirps of a cricket on a warm summer night?
Take good care of your hearing.  Use hearing protection around loud sounds.  Eat well.  A diet high in fruits and vegetables and exercise helps to maintain healthy ears.

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!

Jane Kukula, Au.D.Paula Webster, M.A.
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818