Thursday, August 11, 2016

Is there a good return on investment in hearing aids?

When it comes to an investment in the quality of your life, there’s more than one way to measure value. Diagnosing and treating hearing problems has a positive impact on every aspect of your life, personally, professionally and even financially.

New technology has revolutionized hearing aids. They can automatically adapt to different environments, reducing the interference from background noise. There are daily wear and extended wear instruments.  Many are virtually invisible, sitting discreetly and comfortably inside the ear canal. Best of all, many are wireless, so you can stream sound from smartphones, home entertainment systems and other electronics directly into your hearing aid(s) at volumes just right for you.

When it comes to the purchase of personal items that 
enhance your life, there’s more than one way to measure value. Here are six ways that investing in professionally fitted hearing aids could bring you a greater return on your investment than you ever imagined. 

Using hearing aids reduces the risk of income loss.  People with untreated hearing loss can lose as much as $30,000 in income a year.

There is a link between hearing loss and dementia, 
leading experts to believe that interventions, like hearing aids, could potentially delay dementia. 

People with even a mild hearing loss are nearly three times more likely to have a history of falling. The intensive listening effort demanded by unaddressed hearing loss may take cognitive resources away from what is needed for balance and gait.

People with hearing loss who use hearing aids, may feel more in
 control of their lives and less self-critical. One study found that the majority of people with mild to severe hearing loss felt better about themselves and life overall as a result of using hearing aids.

Hearing aids can help reduce the prominence of tinnitus by
 amplifying background sound.

Using hearing aids can help improve interpersonal relationships.  People with hearing loss reported that using hearing aids improved their relationships at home, their social lives and their ability to join in groups.

Addressing hearing loss really is a smart buying decision. Start with a hearing evaluation.  



Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


Jane Kukula, AuD & Ashley Spisak, AuD
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818










Thursday, August 4, 2016

I heard that smoking can cause hearing loss. Is this true?

Yes, it’s true.  For many years, we’ve known the dangers that smoking presents to hearing.  It’s only recently that they been have studying the hearing link to smoking.  Dr. Bharti Katbamna from the Western Michigan University reported two distinct dangers to hearing.  First, is to the hearing process. Second, is to the fine hearing nerves called hair cells.
Within our heads is a complex collection of parts that make up the ear.  There’s the eardrum, three small bones, and the cochlea.  The cochlea is a snail shaped bone filled with fluid and millions of hair cells. When sound travels through the air it eventually reaches the eardrum.  The eardrum vibrates in sync with the sound, passing the vibration along the three bones to the inner ear, sending a wave through the fluid, stimulating the hair cells.
The recent studies show that the chemicals in cigarette smoke are dangerous to the ear, affecting both the way sound vibrates the eardrum and middle ear bones, and the health of the hair cells. The affect smoking has on hearing is related to the number of cigarettes smoked.  The research shows that as the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the number of years of smoking increases, the risk for high-frequency hearing loss increases.
Unfortunately the negative effects of smoking do not stop within the inner ear but actually continue on into the brain.  Also, studies suggest that chronic nicotine use impairs cognitive auditory processing. In other words smoking can negatively impact the brain’s ability to “hear” and interpret sounds.

So here is yet another reason to quit smoking and have a baseline hearing test. Call for an appointment today at 440-205-8848. 

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!



Jane Kukula, AuD & Ashley Spisak, AuD
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818









Thursday, July 28, 2016

What is an extended wear hearing aid?

Yes, Lyric is the only extended wear hearing aid available.  There are several things that make it unique.  It’s 100% invisible, provides effortless hearing and has natural sound quality.


100% Invisible
Lyric is placed deep in the ear canal, approximately 4 millimeters from the eardrum.  This allows for both the microphone and receiver (speaker) to fit in the ear canal.  It cannot be seen from any angle, at any time.  The programmable device is comfortably placed during a routine office visit.  It is not an implant and it can be removed with a special tool. 

Effortless Hearing
Lyric is the only hearing aid that can be worn without daily insertion or removal and there is no need to change the batteries.  It can be safely worn through daily activities such as showering, exercising, sleeping and talking on the phone.

Natural Sound Quality;
Lyric uses the natural anatomy of the outer ear to direct sound to the microphone, where it is then amplified at the eardrum.  Because Lyric takes advantage of the ear’s anatomy, users experience natural sound quality and improved directionality and localization (the ability to hear where sounds come from).  Eighty six percent Lyric users agree that the sound quality is very good.


To learn more or to see if you are a candidate for Lyric call 440-205-8848 for a complimentary consultation and 30 day trial.  

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!




Jane Kukula, AuD & Ashley Spisak, AuD
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818




Thursday, July 21, 2016

How do you determine who is a good candidate for the extended wear hearing aids?

We look at three factors to determine whether or not you are a candidate for Lyric, the extended wear hearing aid.  

First, we assess your hearing to see if it falls in the fitting range.  For this assessment, we look in your ears, check your eardrums, and evaluate your hearing ability. The evaluation is done in the office and typically is covered by most health insurance plans.

Second, we will go over a questionnaire that looks at health issues and your lifestyle.  We want to ensure that there are no contraindications for using Lyric.  For example, while you can shower with Lyric, you cannot submerge your ears under water.  If you do water exercises and do not put your head under water, then Lyric is an option for you.

Third, we need to make sure Lyric will fit in your ear canal.  The length of the ear canal is measured to determine if it is long enough.  If it long enough to accommodate the device we will assess whether one of the 5 different diameters will fit.  The 5 sizes fit 80% of people.
If you are interested in a 30 day trial call 440-205-8848 to schedule an appointment.  

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


Jane Kukula, AuD & Ashley Spisak, AuD
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Why can I hear the prayers at church but not the sermon?


This a great question!  You hear the prayers because they are familiar to you.  Your brain takes in everything it hears, sees, and knows, putting it all together to make sense out of what you hear.  When listening to something familiar such as the regular prayers at the Sunday service, your brain knows what is said allowing you to “hear it clearly”.  The problem arises with the sermon.  Since you don’t know what is about to be said, the brain cannot anticipate it.  One solution would be to ask your minister to provide copies of the sermon before the service starts.  Then you can read along, you’ll be surprised by how well you “hear”.  Even something as simple as an outline of the sermon will be helpful.
Further, it can be particularly challenging to hear in a church due to the echo.  High ceilings and hard surfaces such as bare walls or walls with little on them, windows without drapes, hard wood floors etc. create an echo.  You can reduce the echo by using drapes, carpeting and fabric wall hangings but this isn’t always practical for churches.  That is why some churches use a special amplifying system with headphones for people with hearing loss.  If your church has this type of system, give it a try.  It will also reduce the echo making it easier for you to hear.
Have regular check-ups with an audiologist.  Periodic hearing checks and routine hearing aid care will ensure your hearing aids are programmed to maximize your hearing and keep then running well. 



Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!

Jane Kukula, Au.D. and Paula Webster, M.A.
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818















Image obtained 9-15-15 at: https://www.google.com/search?q=images+church&biw=1022&bih=907&tbm=isch&imgil=NYRxIaKZ2ro9hM%253A%253BRVhJhF0ZoNXwEM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Ffbcocoee.com%25252F&source=iu&pf=m&fir=NYRxIaKZ2ro9hM%253A%252CRVhJhF0ZoNXwEM%252C_&usg=__gL8IQFKfJSZuT7966ObP2aPoMDA%3D&ved=0CCsQyjdqFQoTCM7ctMWa-ccCFYM6Pgod5PsP8A&ei=ZiX4Vc6RFoP1-AHk97-ADw#imgrc=3MujLA-6YP4RoM%3A&usg=__gL8IQFKfJSZuT7966ObP2aPoMDA%3D

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Can falling be related to hearing loss?

Yes, it can be related if your father has difficulty hearing.  New research shows a link between hearing and falling.  A study at Johns Hopkins hospital looked at over 2,000 people between ages of 40-69.  They were assessed based on hearing ability and the number of falls over a period of one year.  Their findings showed that people with a mild loss of hearing were nearly 3 times more likely to fall.  They also found that for every 10 dB (a measure of sound intensity) increase in hearing loss, the chances of falling increased by 1.4.  They discovered on the average those

                With 25 dB loss were 3 times more likely to fall
                With 35 dB loss were 4.4 times more likely to fall
                With 45 dB loss were 5.8 times more likely to fall
                With 55 dB loss were 7.2 times more likely to fall
                With 65 dB loss were 8.6 times more likely to fall

This was true even when age, cardiovascular and vestibular health were taken into account.  One reason for is people with difficulty hearing are less aware of their environment, making tripping and falling more likely.  Another cause was the brain becomes be overwhelmed by the work load needed for hearing when hearing loss is untreated. 

This is startling information and another great reason to seek hearing help.  If you, or another loved one is experiencing changes in hearing or experiencing falls, call to schedule a hearing evaluation.  

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!

Jane Kukula, Au.D. and Paula Webster, M.A.
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818


Thursday, September 24, 2015

My husband plays in a rock band and doesn't use hearing protection. Can this hurt his hearing?

Yes, loud sound, even loud music, can harm hearing. Hearing loss caused by exposure to loud sound is called noise induced hearing loss.  Using hearing protection can help him preserve his hearing.  If he has played in the band for many years, it may already have had a negative impact on his hearing. But that doesn’t mean hearing protection would not help, it can help prevent increased hearing loss when used properly.

There are many types of earplugs and muffs available.  Custom fit musician’s earplugs were designed for musicians. They have filters which do not distort the sound allowing maintaining the quality of music.

Musicians’ monitors can be custom fit to provide clear hearing, eliminate feedback and lower noise levels so that one can reduce the volume on the monitor.  Your audiologist can help find the best solution for your husband.

By raising awareness of noise induced hearing loss we hope to help people maintain healthy hearing.  Part of our commitment to our community is to provide disposable ear plugs at no charge.  Just stop in this month to pick up a pair.  


Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!

Jane Kukula, Au.D. and Paula Webster, M.A.
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818