Thursday, August 28, 2014

What is the best way to talk with someone who has hearing loss/


This is a question we are frequently asked.  It is very important to recognize that those with hearing loss are going to require some special attention in order to effectively communicate.  Most importantly, be sure to speak face to face.  Individuals with hearing loss, even if wearing hearing aids, depend a great deal on facial expression and lip movements to fully understand what is being said.  Speaking with a mouth full of food or chewing gum makes lip reading very difficult.  Also, being in the same room is paramount.  It is not possible to carry on a satisfactory conversation from a different room, with the dishwasher running, the fan going or the television set on. 

It is not necessary to raise your voice or “yell”.  Speaking in a clear, distinct voice is most effective, particularly when speaking on the telephone.  This method of communication allows the person with the hearing loss to understand enough words to realize what you are trying to communicate.  Also, if you raise your voice, your facial expression changes and it would appear that you are upset or angry.

Noisy environments are particularly challenging for those with hearing issues.  Attempt to find settings away from air conditioners, running water, entryways, speakers and the restaurant kitchen.  If seated in a restaurant, be sure to find a quiet location and sit across the table from the person with hearing loss. 

Hearing aids do not restore hearing to normal.  They are very helpful in improving the ability to communicate, but it is necessary for everyone to contribute toward a successful conversational situation.  The person with hearing loss needs to advocate for themselves.  Family, friends and co-workers must be told what is needed to help improve communication.  Hearing loss is invisible and it is easy to forget someone has a hearing problem.

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818







Thursday, August 21, 2014

Can using hearing aids reduce stress?



Lack of communication is stressful - not just for the person with hearing difficulty but also for the people in his/her life.  Hearing loss and its communication challenges effect everyone.  A “bad hearing day” for someone with hearing problems can mean fatigue, frustration, even anger and depression.  Communication can breakdown with the added frustration and annoyance of those trying to talk to the person with hearing loss.


Among the most significant factors in the Quality of Life Index are health, family and community.  Good communication impacts all of these in a positive way.  People with hearing problems who use hearing instruments are healthier physically, emotionally and mentally.  They are more engaged with family and have a more active social life.  They are more successful at connecting with the community thru easier communication with family, friends, neighbors, shop clerks etc.


Another area of importance is work.  Many of us have stressful jobs.  Hearing problems can cause challenging communication situations at work adding to the stress.  Stress can reduce job satisfaction, job performance and overall energy levels.  People who use hearing instruments at work communicate easier with co-workers, supervisors and clients, and earn up to $25,000 more a year.  

There is much to gain by using hearing instruments including reduced stress.  Start with an audiologic (hearing) evaluation.  With those results, we will be able to assess the effects of hearing loss on your life and find the best hearing solution for you.  

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818






 Image obtained 8-5-14 at: http://www.mormonchannel.org/gospel-solutions-for-families/34

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Are scientists working on a cure for hearing loss?



Red Light Therapy ResearchYes, there is some very exciting research in hearing.  Hopefully, one day it will provide a cure for hearing loss.  Here are few recent discoveries:

Nerve loss is the most common type of permanent hearing loss.  Nerve loss results from damage to the hearing nerves called haircells.  These fine nerve fibers, once damaged, cannot be restored.  Recently, scientists found that chickens are able to spontaneously rejuvenate damaged haircells.  Researchers are now working with stem cells as a possible means to restore haircells in humans.  This could have a positive impact in the lives of millions of Americans, helping them to hear better.   

Not only does it appear that one day we may be able to repair damaged haircells but we may also be able to protect haircells from noise exposure with a pill.  While still in the research stage, the pill appears to be most effective in protecting the ear when taken prior to the exposure and may even be protective when taken hours later.  This can be great news for people in the military, working in factories and many others who are exposed to loud sounds.

Did you know mice are born without hearing?  Around two weeks of age, their hearing develops.  By looking at how hearing develops in mice, scientists discovered a very precise rhythm of electrical impulses coming from the ear.  These impulses develop and organize the auditory (hearing) pathways.  This information may prove helpful in understanding causes of auditory processing disorders and hopefully lead to more effective treatment.  

Taking good care of your ears and hearing includes regular audiologic care. We recommend regular audiologic check-ups when you experience changes in hearing, and signs of hearing loss such as muffling of voices.


Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818


Image obtained 8-4-14 at: http://redlighttherapylamps.org/red-light-therapy-scientific-research/

Thursday, August 7, 2014

What is the first step to improving my hearing?



A complete hearing evaluation (Audiologic Assessment) is the first step.  Many people go through life simply “living with” hearing loss, never recognizing there are solutions readily available!  Diagnostic hearing testing will identify the nature and degree of your hearing and understanding challenges.  Following the complete testing, recommendations for treatment will be made.  You have a great deal to gain by having a complete hearing test.


Treatment may be as simple as the removal of excess earwax.  If necessary, a referral for medical treatment will be made.  Sensorineural hearing loss will cause speech to be difficult to understand, even if the volume of sound appears to be adequate. Recommendations may include hearing aids, listening therapy, and use of assistive listening devices and the support of counseling. 


Hearing aids provide the amplification of sound.  Digital technology allows the flexibility to cater to our individual lifestyles and needs.  Miniature behind the ear instruments are now available and are practically invisible.  Several options include directional microphones, multiple programs and automatic programming, volume control and telephone switches.  Extended wear instruments may also be an option.


Assistive listening devices can make the activities of daily living more accessible.  Amplified telephones, vibrating alarm clocks, alerting doorbells and wireless TV amplifiers provide additional sound awareness.

The psychological impact of hearing loss should not be overlooked.  Often denial of hearing loss leads to frustration, exhaustion, isolation and even depression.  Listen to your family and co-workers, call for an appointment today.   The importance of seeking help for hearing loss cannot be emphasized enough! 


Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818




Image obtained 8-5-14 at: http://www.thejmbpartnership.com/what-we-do/first-step/

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Why does someone resist seeking hearing aids?



Sometimes people with hearing loss resist seeking help.  There are many reasons for their resistance.  Understanding where it comes from may help you to work with her.

She may not realize what she does not hear.  Hearing loss is often gradual.  It decreases slowly over time.  So slowly, people don’t always notice the changes.  Some sounds such as bird songs, fade away without notice and aren’t missed.  

Denial is another reason.  Hearing loss causes voices to sound soft and mumbled.  For example, children are often soft spoken, making it easy to assume they are not speaking up.

Not knowing or not understanding about hearing and hearing instruments or where to go and who to see can create fear.  To complicate it, many have heard stories of people being unsuccessful with hearing devices.  This can create concern about making a good decision.

Help your mother focus on how hearing impacts her family and social life.  Those with untreated hearing loss will isolate themselves and withdraw from family and social situations.  Share with her how you feel when she is not able to participate in family activities.  Stop in and pick up some information that may help her understand the many ways she stands to gain by addressing her hearing difficulty. 

When she is ready, schedule an audiologic (hearing and ear function) assessment.  Call l-440-205-8848 for an appointment.  We will guide her through the process and support her in meeting her hearing goals.  


Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818


Image obtained 7-8-14 at: http://possiblyhelpfuladvice.com/?p=4839