Thursday, August 20, 2015

Can playing in a band hurt hearing?


Yes, loud sound, even loud music, can harm hearing. Hearing loss caused by exposure to loud sound is called noise induced hearing loss.  Using hearing protection can help preserve hearing.  If someone has played in the band for many years, it may already have had a negative impact on hearing. But that doesn’t mean hearing protection would not help, it can help prevent increased hearing loss when used properly.
There are many types of earplugs and muffs available.  Ear muffs can distort the quality of the music.  I recommend musician earplugs.  Custom fit musician’s earplugs are designed for musicians. They have filters which do not distort the sound maintaining the quality of music. See an audiologist to have ear impressions taken so that they fit comfortably.
Musicians’ monitors are also custom fit.  They provide clear hearing, eliminate feedback and lower noise levels so that one can reduce the volume on the monitor. 

See an audiologist to find the best solution best fit to your personal needs.
Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!

Jane Kukula, Au.D. and Paula Webster, M.A.
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818

Thursday, August 13, 2015


Research shows that people with diabetes are twice as likely to have hearing loss.  It is believed, that high sugar levels damage the blood vessels and nerves in the ear.  Hearing health considerations need to be part of good management plan for diabetes. The Better Hearing Institute (BHI), and has issued five habits for healthier hearing for people with diabetes.

1) Get a thorough hearing exam every year and watch for signs of hearing loss. You do it for your eyes. Now do it for your ears. See an audiologist every year for a thorough audiologic assessment

2) Use hearing aids, if recommended. Hearing aid technology has advanced radically in recent years. While hearing loss is not reversible, today’s hearing aids can dramatically enhance your ability to hear and engage with others—which can make a tremendous difference in your overall quality of life.

3) Keep your blood sugar under control. Just as your heart, eye, and nerve health are affected by your blood sugar levels, your hearing health may be as well.

4) Maintain a healthy lifestyle. Even for people without diabetes, a healthy lifestyle benefits hearing health. Not smoking, exercising, and maintaining a healthy diet all support your ability to hear.

5) Use ear protection. Everyone is at risk of noise-induced hearing loss. But using ear protection is one of the best—and simplest—things you can do to preserve your hearing.
Start now, obtain a baseline hearing evaluation. 




Research shows that people with diabetes are twice as likely to have hearing loss.  It is believed, that high sugar levels damage the blood vessels and nerves in the ear.  Hearing health considerations need to be part of good management plan for diabetes. The Better Hearing Institute (BHI), and has issued five habits for healthier hearing for people with diabetes.

1) Get a thorough hearing exam every year and watch for signs of hearing loss. You do it for your eyes. Now do it for your ears. See an audiologist every year for a thorough audiologic assessment

2) Use hearing aids, if recommended. Hearing aid technology has advanced radically in recent years. While hearing loss is not reversible, today’s hearing aids can dramatically enhance your ability to hear and engage with others—which can make a tremendous difference in your overall quality of life.

3) Keep your blood sugar under control. Just as your heart, eye, and nerve health are affected by your blood sugar levels, your hearing health may be as well.

4) Maintain a healthy lifestyle. Even for people without diabetes, a healthy lifestyle benefits hearing health. Not smoking, exercising, and maintaining a healthy diet all support your ability to hear.

5) Use ear protection. Everyone is at risk of noise-induced hearing loss. But using ear protection is one of the best—and simplest—things you can do to preserve your hearing.
Start now, obtain a baseline hearing evaluation. 
 

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!

Jane Kukula, Au.D. and Paula Webster, M.A.
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818


Thursday, August 6, 2015


It is important to treat your hearing instruments with care.  This way you will keep them in good working order for many years, and minimize potential problems during everyday use.  Hearing aids may be sturdy, but they cannot withstand improper use.  

Protect your hearing aids from moisture.  Moisture and condensation may damage the electronics in your hearing aids. Remove your hearing aids before showering, bathing or swimming.  Due to the high humidity, you should not leave the devices in the bathroom.  Dry your ears before inserting the hearing aids.  Use a hearing aid dehumidifier at night if you perspire heavily or work outdoors.
Protect your hearing aids from dirt.  Always make sure that your fingers are clean and dry before touching your hearing aids.  The microphone openings are very small and can become blocked through improper handling.  Avoid contact with hairspray or make-up.  The fine particles of hairspray or powder make-up may clog the microphone opening and volume control and program switches.  
Keep the devices away from children and pets. Store your hearing aids in the case that is provided, out of the reach of children and pets.  Be sure to disengage the battery door.  A high pitched squeal is emitted when the hearing aids are out of your ears and running.  This can raise the curiosity of some pets.
In order to be fully functional, your hearing aids need to be clean at all times. Clean the devices with a soft, dry cloth.  Never use alcohol, solvents or cleaning agents.  Follow the manufacturers’ instructions for cleaning ear wax from the devices.  Special care products for your hearing aids are available at our office.  Stop in and have us clean your hearing aids every 3-6 months.  



Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!

Jane Kukula, Au.D. and Paula Webster, M.A.
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818
 

Thursday, July 30, 2015

What can I expect when purchasing hearing aids

When considering investing in hearing instruments, it’s important to establish reasonable expectations.  Obtaining hearing instruments is an on-going process.  It starts with the realization that you are missing sounds and conversations that are important to you.  Your motivation to hear well and stay connected to family, friends and co-workers is the most important motivation.  Here are a few things you can expect.

Expect others to notice your hearing difficulties before you do.  Trust family and friends when they suggest you have a hearing evaluation (audiologic assessment).  They are noticing something that you are yet unaware of or feel has other causes.  If you find yourself saying things such as people mumble or they don’t look at you when they are talking, know these are signs of hearing difficulty.

Expect your audiologist to listen to you and your concerns.  Your plan for improved hearing will be based on your hearing needs and lifestyle.   The hearing instruments recommended for you will be able to adjust according to your listening needs.  Expect that the hearing instruments will fit comfortably.  You will have an initial awareness of having something in and on your ears.  After a while, you should lose this awareness and not even notice there is something in your ear.

Expect that you will hear better with hearing instruments.  While hearing aids do not restore normal hearing, you will hear more easily. Conversations will flow more naturally with less work on your part.  Your awareness of your environment will increase. You will overhear children in another room laughing, birds singing outside and other sounds in and around the house. 

Expect it will take a period of time for you to adjust to your hearing instruments.  You will be more aware of all sounds around you, including background noise.  The increased background noise will hold your attention in the beginning.  Given time, you learn to ignore background noise just like everyone else.  Also, it takes time to get use to how your voice sounds to you.


Expect that Life Sounds Great! And
Expect that you will
Enjoy Every Moment!


Jane Kukula, Au.D.Paula Webster, M.A.
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848Fax: 440-205-9818
http://aacHEAR.org



Thursday, July 23, 2015

How long do hearing aids last?

The average hearing aid lifespan varies significantly due to the conditions they are used in and the way you care for them.  The older the hearing aids, the more often they tend to breakdown resulting in repairs.  When it comes to hearing aids, seven years may not seem very long, but the devices are considered ancient by that time.
The average lifespan is about 5 years.  There are several reasons for this:
·         Paying to repair older technology is a poor investment (typically being more expensive with age)
·         Repairs of older aids are not as reliable as newer ones
·         Parts replaced on older hearing aids may come from other older, and sometimes used, hearing aids
·         The technology is outdated
·         Old software often cannot be used on newer computers making it impossible to adjust older devices as hearing changes
·         Hearing may change so much that stronger hearing aids are needed
·         Hearing aids are not designed to last indefinitely
Hearing instruments can continue to perform very well, and last longer than the average five years, by giving them proper care.  Moisture is the leading cause of breakdowns.  Using a hearing aid dehumidifier can reduce the number of repairs and extend the life of your hearing devices.
Hearing aids eventually reach a point where it is no longer feasible to invest in repairs.  If you love the hearing aids you have, and aren't sure where you want to invest your time and money in new instruments, discuss the costs and benefits with your audiologist.  We work to support your hearing goals, including maximizing your investment in hearing instruments.  

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!

Jane Kukula, Au.D.Paula Webster, M.A.
 
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848Fax: 440-205-9818
http://aacHEAR.org









Thursday, July 16, 2015

How long do hearing aid batteries last?

Most hearing aids will have a 5-10 day battery life.  Today’s technology is great and it needs power.  We use many electronic devices daily.  Think about how long your cell phone or tablet run before needing to be recharged.  ?  Batteries for these devices typically only last hours.  Using these devices constantly for 10-12 hours as one would with hearing aids, they would need to recharged daily.
Hearing instruments are small and so are the batteries.  This leaves little room for an electrical charge. The estimated battery life depends on your hearing aids and the length of time you wear them.  Further, using a hearing aid streamer or other accessory places an even bigger demand for power on the battery.
Some hearing instruments use rechargeable batteries.  While this sounds like a good solution, there are some “bugs” in how rechargeable batteries work in hearing devices.  Often those who have tried rechargeable switch to disposable batteries. 
Your hearing instruments require a certain size battery, but not all batteries will work the same.  Hearing aid manufacturers typically recommend a specific brand of battery to use with their devices.  Find out what brand battery works best with your hearing instruments.  Using the recommended brand will give you the best possible battery life. 


Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!

Jane Kukula, Au.D.Paula Webster, M.A.
 
8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848Fax: 440-205-9818
http://aacHEAR.org