Friday, September 26, 2014

How “bad” does hearing need to be before hearing aids help?


The short answer to your question is that if hearing loss is present, even at a mild level, use of hearing aids will be helpful.


A hearing loss between 16 and 25dB is considered a borderline normal level or a minimal hearing loss.  In children, a hearing loss at this level will significantly impact the ability to learn language and succeed academically.  For adults, with a hearing loss at this level, people may seem to “mumble” or speak softly.  Communication in group settings, in the presence of even a slight amount of noise, will become very challenging.  Participation in social events, church functions and family gatherings may be frustrating and even embarrassing, when hearing loss results in miscommunication.
 

Quite often, even a minimal hearing loss can result in anger and frustration, anxiety, depression and isolation.  Success depends upon what your husband’s expectations are from treatment with hearing aids. They have been shown to improve communication in all situations.  Certainly hearing aids will help to improve communication with the family, in church, stores and on the telephone.  The volume on the television set will be lowered, reducing a great deal of tension around the house.  Participation in group meetings will become much more satisfying.  He may even begin to realize that communication is no longer exhausting.  With the help of hearing instruments, your husband may recognize just what he has been missing. 




Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818



Image obtained 9-16-14 at: https://www.google.com/search?q=images+of+help&biw=1319&bih=914&tbm=isch&imgil=Hi9XCYDk47ArcM%253A%253BDxJXeUI0k1SICM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fmicrosoftupdateshelp.com%25252F&source=iu&pf=m&fir=Hi9XCYDk47ArcM%253A%252CDxJXeUI0k1SICM%252C_&usg=__HESq3wH6LHERm_AIWwGYcMAz_I0%3D&ved=0CDUQyjc&ei=sJwYVJ31Nc6TyASE2YLABQ#facrc=_&imgdii=-febcMLmvmgfCM%3A%3B_ewL1xNCJ6fD3M%3B-febcMLmvmgfCM%3A&imgrc=-febcMLmvmgfCM%253A%3BDymGzhvzQkvRXM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.customrecall.com%252Fmedia%252Fwysiwyg%252Fhelp-button.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.customrecall.com%252Fneedhelp%3B730%3B655

Thursday, September 18, 2014

How long do hearing aid batteries last?

The power requirements of hearing instruments varies. Hearing aid batteries can last anywhere from several days to a couple of weeks.  Today’s technology is great but it needs power.  We use many electronic devices daily.  Think about how long your cell phone or tablet run before needing to be recharged.  What if you used these constantly for 10-12 hours such as with hearing aids?  Batteries for these devices typically only last hours.  Using them all day you would need to recharge them several times.
Hearing instruments are small and so are the batteries.  This leaves little room for an electrical charge. The estimated battery life depends on your hearing aids and the length of time you wear them.  Further, using a hearing aid streamer or other accessory places an even bigger demand for power on the battery.
Some hearing instruments use rechargeable batteries.  While this sounds like a good solution, there are some “bugs” in how rechargeable batteries work in hearing devices.  Often those who have tried rechargeable switch to disposable batteries. 
Talk to your audiologist about battery life.  He/she will let you know what to expect in battery life.  Further, hearing instruments will require a certain size battery, but not all batteries will work the same.  Hearing aid manufacturers typically recommend a specific brand of battery to use with their devices.  Find out what brand battery works best with your hearing instruments.  Using the recommended brand will give you the best possible battery life.  
Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818


Image obtained 8-201-4 at: https://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=Ap0Xstno1mJKDMEn_xSeiA.bvZx4?=images+of+hearing+aid+batteries&toggle=1&cop=mss&ei=UTF-8&fr=yfp-t-901&fp=1

Thursday, September 11, 2014

What is the lifespan of a hearing aid?

As with any battery driven electronic device, hearing aids last much longer than the power source. The average hearing aid lifespan varies significantly due to the conditions they are used in and the way you care for them.  But breakdowns happen.  The older the hearing aids, the more often they tend to breakdown resulting in costly repairs.  When it comes to hearing aids, seven years may not seem very long, but the devices are considered ancient by that time.
The average lifespan is about 5 years.  There are several reasons for this:
·         Paying to repair older technology is a poor investment (typically being more expensive           with age)
·         Repairs of older aids are not as reliable as newer ones
·         Parts replaced on older hearing aids may come from other older, and sometimes used,         hearing aids
·         The technology is outdated
·         Old software often cannot be used on newer computers making it impossible to adjust           the devices for hearing changes
·         Hearing may change so much that stronger hearing aids are needed
·         Hearing aids are not designed to last a human lifetime
Hearing instruments can continue to perform very well, and last longer than the average five years, by giving them proper care.  Moisture is the leading cause of breakdowns.  Using a hearing aid dehumidifier can reduce the number of repairs and extend the life of your hearing devices.
Hearing aids eventually reach a point where it is no longer feasible to invest in repairs.  If you love the hearing aids you have, and aren't sure where you want to invest your time and money in new instruments, discuss the costs and benefits with your audiologist.  We work to support your hearing goals, including maximizing your investment in hearing instruments.

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818




Image obtained 8-20-14 at: http://thedaytodayobservationsandrants.blogspot.com/2012/05/characters-lifespan.html

Thursday, September 4, 2014

How do you take care of hearing aids?

It is important to treat your hearing instruments with care.  This way you will keep them in good working order for many years, and minimize potential problems during everyday use.  Hearing aids may be sturdy, but they cannot withstand improper use.  


Protect your hearing aids from moisture.  Moisture and condensation may damage the electronics in your hearing aids. Remove your hearing aids before showering, bathing or swimming.  Due to the high humidity, you should not leave the devices in the bathroom.  Dry your ears before inserting the hearing aids.  Use a hearing aid dehumidifier at night if you perspire heavily or work outdoors.

Protect your hearing aids from dirt.  Always make sure that your fingers are clean and dry before touching your hearing aids.  The microphone openings are very small and can become blocked through improper handling.  Avoid contact with hairspray or make-up.  The fine particles of hairspray or powder make-up may clog the microphone opening and volume control and program switches.  

Keep the devices away from children and pets. Store your hearing aids in the case that is provided, out of the reach of children and pets.  Be sure to disengage the battery door.  A high pitched squeal is emitted when the hearing aids are out of your ears and running.  This can raise the curiosity of some pets.

In order to be fully functional, your hearing aids need to be clean at all times. Clean the devices with a soft, dry cloth.  Never use alcohol, solvents or cleaning agents.  Follow the manufacturers’ instructions for cleaning ear wax from the devices.  Special care products for your hearing aids are available at our office.  Stop in and have us clean your hearing aids every 3-6 months.  


Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818


Image obtained 8-20-14 at: http://www.phonakpro.com/us/b2b/en/products/hearing_instruments/virto-q/hearing-aid/styles/nano.html

Thursday, August 28, 2014

What is the best way to talk with someone who has hearing loss/


This is a question we are frequently asked.  It is very important to recognize that those with hearing loss are going to require some special attention in order to effectively communicate.  Most importantly, be sure to speak face to face.  Individuals with hearing loss, even if wearing hearing aids, depend a great deal on facial expression and lip movements to fully understand what is being said.  Speaking with a mouth full of food or chewing gum makes lip reading very difficult.  Also, being in the same room is paramount.  It is not possible to carry on a satisfactory conversation from a different room, with the dishwasher running, the fan going or the television set on. 

It is not necessary to raise your voice or “yell”.  Speaking in a clear, distinct voice is most effective, particularly when speaking on the telephone.  This method of communication allows the person with the hearing loss to understand enough words to realize what you are trying to communicate.  Also, if you raise your voice, your facial expression changes and it would appear that you are upset or angry.

Noisy environments are particularly challenging for those with hearing issues.  Attempt to find settings away from air conditioners, running water, entryways, speakers and the restaurant kitchen.  If seated in a restaurant, be sure to find a quiet location and sit across the table from the person with hearing loss. 

Hearing aids do not restore hearing to normal.  They are very helpful in improving the ability to communicate, but it is necessary for everyone to contribute toward a successful conversational situation.  The person with hearing loss needs to advocate for themselves.  Family, friends and co-workers must be told what is needed to help improve communication.  Hearing loss is invisible and it is easy to forget someone has a hearing problem.

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818







Thursday, August 21, 2014

Can using hearing aids reduce stress?



Lack of communication is stressful - not just for the person with hearing difficulty but also for the people in his/her life.  Hearing loss and its communication challenges effect everyone.  A “bad hearing day” for someone with hearing problems can mean fatigue, frustration, even anger and depression.  Communication can breakdown with the added frustration and annoyance of those trying to talk to the person with hearing loss.


Among the most significant factors in the Quality of Life Index are health, family and community.  Good communication impacts all of these in a positive way.  People with hearing problems who use hearing instruments are healthier physically, emotionally and mentally.  They are more engaged with family and have a more active social life.  They are more successful at connecting with the community thru easier communication with family, friends, neighbors, shop clerks etc.


Another area of importance is work.  Many of us have stressful jobs.  Hearing problems can cause challenging communication situations at work adding to the stress.  Stress can reduce job satisfaction, job performance and overall energy levels.  People who use hearing instruments at work communicate easier with co-workers, supervisors and clients, and earn up to $25,000 more a year.  

There is much to gain by using hearing instruments including reduced stress.  Start with an audiologic (hearing) evaluation.  With those results, we will be able to assess the effects of hearing loss on your life and find the best hearing solution for you.  

Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818






 Image obtained 8-5-14 at: http://www.mormonchannel.org/gospel-solutions-for-families/34

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Are scientists working on a cure for hearing loss?



Red Light Therapy ResearchYes, there is some very exciting research in hearing.  Hopefully, one day it will provide a cure for hearing loss.  Here are few recent discoveries:

Nerve loss is the most common type of permanent hearing loss.  Nerve loss results from damage to the hearing nerves called haircells.  These fine nerve fibers, once damaged, cannot be restored.  Recently, scientists found that chickens are able to spontaneously rejuvenate damaged haircells.  Researchers are now working with stem cells as a possible means to restore haircells in humans.  This could have a positive impact in the lives of millions of Americans, helping them to hear better.   

Not only does it appear that one day we may be able to repair damaged haircells but we may also be able to protect haircells from noise exposure with a pill.  While still in the research stage, the pill appears to be most effective in protecting the ear when taken prior to the exposure and may even be protective when taken hours later.  This can be great news for people in the military, working in factories and many others who are exposed to loud sounds.

Did you know mice are born without hearing?  Around two weeks of age, their hearing develops.  By looking at how hearing develops in mice, scientists discovered a very precise rhythm of electrical impulses coming from the ear.  These impulses develop and organize the auditory (hearing) pathways.  This information may prove helpful in understanding causes of auditory processing disorders and hopefully lead to more effective treatment.  

Taking good care of your ears and hearing includes regular audiologic care. We recommend regular audiologic check-ups when you experience changes in hearing, and signs of hearing loss such as muffling of voices.


Life sounds great!  Enjoy every moment!


8897 Mentor Ave
Mentor, Ohio 44060
440-205-8848
Fax: 440-205-9818


Image obtained 8-4-14 at: http://redlighttherapylamps.org/red-light-therapy-scientific-research/